Healthcare Technology

Earlier this month, healthcare companies and thought leaders met at the annual Healthcare Information & Management Systems Society in Las Vegas.

HIMSS is one of the industry’s most influential health information and technology events, featuring informative sessions, cutting-edge product displays, and superior networking opportunities.

In case you missed it, here are 4 key takeaways from HIMSS18:

What health IT gadgets are athlete's using in this year's Olympic games? Which healthcare program will receive funding under the recent spending bill? Could a UV lamp prevent the spread of Influenza?

Which data security threat has healthcare leaders worried? What is blockchain technology and why does it matter to healthcare? What changes are coming to MACRA in 2018?

Stay informed on the latest healthcare news with these hand picked articles from around the web. This is the NueMD Top Five.

In a recent TED Talk on cybercrime, Caleb Barlow remarked that in 2015 alone 100 million people lost their health insurance data to thieves. Despite the growing urgency of ransomware attacks on the healthcare industry, federal funding to prevent cybersecurity threats remains in the thousands, while the cost of these breaches is estimated to be in the millions. Recently, a breach that occurred after a server of the Orleans Medical Clinic was hacked left patient information accessible to thieves for more than 12 days. While the personal information available in health care records remains so  lucrative for criminals, it’s up to healthcare providers to stay vigilant in the fight against data loss.

Andy Matthews's picture
Aug 24, 2016

Hospitals produced an estimated 697 million megabytes of data in 2015.  That’s more than two megabytes of medical data for every man, woman and child in the United States. And while we may spend billions of dollars and more hours entering data than seeing patients, much of that data remains inaccessible, hidden behind proprietary data architectures, authorizations and patient matching problems.

Imagine you decide to go to the Emergency Department or even an acute care clinic right now. How far would you have to travel, what would you need to bring, what comforts would you leave behind for a harried, hurried trip to a waiting room? And just how much would this trip cost? On the other hand, how long would it take you to set up a FaceTime chat? 

Back in 2012, Brian Dolan wrote an article on mobihealthnews.com about Fitbit data being uploaded into electronic health records (EHR).

For decades, the majority of patients have traveled to an appointment with a physician with one thing in mind: “treatment.” Regardless of the cost or available evidence, most patients trusted physicians with a “you’re-the-doctor” attitude and took whatever medication was prescribed. However, today’s system is rapidly evolving. Patients are now researching their symptoms and diagnoses. Often times they may be overdoing it or relying on inaccurate information, but none the less, our society is now full of educated patients.

Last fall, Vinod Khosla made the bold statement that technology will automate or replace 80 percent of doctors. He sparked some serious concern amongst physicians everywhere. Is he right? In some sense, he is correct in saying that much of what a doctor does will be automated. Even now, most physicians are scrambling to the nearest device with internet access to look up a drug or disease. Khosla’s theory assumes there can be an even faster way to sense, record, and analyze signs and symptoms. He is likely correct, but that still only accelerates the diagnostic process. However, diagnosis is generally only a portion of the job of a physician.

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